WE PLANT THE "SEEDS OF IDEAS" IN DOG OWNERS MINDS - THESE IDEAS EVENTUALLY BLOSSOM INTO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF DOG BEHAVIOUR - Sally Hopkins
WE PLANT THE "SEEDS OF IDEAS" IN DOG OWNERS MINDS - THESE IDEAS EVENTUALLY BLOSSOM INTO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF DOG BEHAVIOUR - Sally Hopkins

EXAMPLES

To finish this part of the website, here are some examples of how dogs can become FASEDUP in a

TRAINING OR SHOW ENVIRONMENT

  • Changes in the owner's behaviour before, during and after a show
  • The visual triggers of preparing and packing all the clothing, bags and equipment for training or a show
  • Car travel - especially if dogs are crammed in together and are invading each others personal space
  • Too many people and dogs too close together at the venue - crowded environment
  • Being unnerved by the handler's apprehension and nervousness
  • The sight of equipment (eg agility or flyball) and dogs using it
  • Picking up the stress and excitement of the other dogs, particularly when queuing or near the ring/training area
  • Other dogs invading its personal space and making it feel threatened, particularly when queuing
  • Unable to satisfy its instincts and senses by having no opportunity to feel at ease and explore strange smells and objects before being asked to "work"
  • Handler's commands and signals (see Dogs Dictionary) which are not consistent or are too slow in being given and therefore frustrate the dog as it tries to understand what it should be doing next
  • Too many commands (particularly negative ones) - no "off switch"
  • Handler asking for too high a standard/ too high expectations when the dog is not able to work due to its levels of stress or not understanding what is expected of it
  • Being put back in the car straight after a run and getting cramp, or interpreting being put away as a punishment for doing the exercise wrong.
  • Humans ignoring the dog's calming signals or symptoms of stress
  • Dog not fulfilled mentally or physically
  • Unable to rest and relax between sessions due to the visual and sound stimulus that it is exposed to. The dog then becomes tired and irritable and finds it even more difficult to concentrate when it is supposed to be "working".
  • Unable to exercise its muscles or explore its surroundings. Many owners feel the need to "exercise" their dog at shows by throwing toys for their dogs to chase after, then wonder why the dog finds it so difficult to concentrate when it is working (its adrenaline levels are too high). Instead of this frantic activity the dog would far rather be allowed to sniff and explore the exercise area ("reading the newspaper") and switch its brain on ready to concentrate on the work it will be asked to do. This, and suitable Warming Up Exercises, will be more than sufficient to prepare the dog's body and mind for the task ahead.
  • Having to confront things that either frighten, or cause anxiety in the dog.

 

 

This web site has been written by Sally Hopkins (unless the author of the web page is stated otherwise).

 

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