WE PLANT THE "SEEDS OF IDEAS" IN DOG OWNERS MINDS - THESE IDEAS EVENTUALLY BLOSSOM INTO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF DOG BEHAVIOUR - Sally Hopkins
WE PLANT THE "SEEDS OF IDEAS" IN DOG OWNERS MINDS - THESE IDEAS EVENTUALLY BLOSSOM INTO A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF DOG BEHAVIOUR - Sally Hopkins

BOUNCE & HAND

This webpage contains a description of the following -

  • Summary of Bounce & Hand

  • Equipment needed

  • Bounce & Hand Starters Level

  • Bounce & Hand Bronze Level

  • Bounce & Hand Silver Level

  • Bounce & Hand Gold Level

  • Bounce & Hand Platinum level

  • What the Handler learns

  • What the dog learns

  • several other dogs

 

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

SUMMARY -

The dog learns to run over some jumps, retrieve an object a distance of approximately 50ft/15m from the Handler and return to the Handler over the same jumps. The object retrieved can be anything that the dog is comfortable with carrying in his mouth. Dumbells are often used in obedience classes because they are easy for the dog to pick up regardless of how they end up having been "thrown" or placed. We DO NOT THROW items in Dog Games because this could trigger the "chase mode" in dogs.

Commands such as “sit”, “down”, “stay”, “wait” etc. are not required in this or any other Dog Game.

 

AIMS -

This new Game combines what the dog learnt in 2 earlier Dog Games. One called Bounce, where the dog learns to jump four 8 inch/20cm flyball jumps set about 10ft/3m apart in a line. The other Dog Game is called Hand (or Retrieve) where the dog learns eventually to run away from their Handler to a black rubber mat 50ft/15m away to retrieve a "toy" and return it to the Handler's hand for a reward - its motivator. Dogs enjoy this game as they have the added bonus of jumping the low hurdles as well as retrieving things for their handler.

 

In Dog Games training we continually repeat some of the most simple instructions and ideas to instill them in the Handlers so that it becomes second nature to them

 

This Game (Bounce & Hand) is the most difficult. It builds on 2 earlier Games and lays the foundation for another 2 Games. Therefore I have probably written too much with simple explanations but I have assumed that there may be some not very experienced dog handlers who want to try these Games and so I have tried to write at a very simple level to help them.  

 

EQUIPMENT NEEDED -

  • netted training area

  • comfortable harness and lead

  • treat box or motivator

  • toy

  • black rubber car mat

  • 4 flyball jumps (8 inch/20cm high jumps)

At the Silver level of any Game, plastic netting should be used between lanes in the interests of the safety for each dog.

 

The dog has retrieved the "toy" (empty plastic water bottle" but has walked around the jump and not gone over the jump.

bounce & HAND STARTERS LEVEL

see Before Each Training Session Begins

see also Problems with Hand/Retrieve

 

The dog should have already been taught these 2 Games seperately. Therefore we will now combine these 2 Games into a new Game.

 

Before starting this Game, please observe the dogs behaviour when they are "Reading the Newspaper" in their respective Lanes.

  • Have they noticed each other?
  • How have they reacted to the presence of the other dog?
  • Could these 2 dogs work together in their seperate Lanes?
  • Is one too excited by the other one?

The situation needs to be managed.

At least two people are needed to train and play Bounce & Hand - the Handler and the Trainer/Helper. The Trainer stands behind the black mat placed in the box area throughout the Game and places the "toy" on the mat just before the dog is due to run. A complete Bounce & Hand run would be for the dog to be sent from the Handler over the small jumps, to pick up the toy from the mat beside the Trainer and return over these same jumps to place the toy in the Handler's hand and to be rewarded with its motivator.

 

As with Bounce above, the dog is trained at his own pace, starting with 1 jump and adding more jumps (to a max of 4) at given spacings (see Lane layout) as the dog progresses and gains confidence in doing this Game correctly. The distance between the release of the dog and the black mat is increased with each successful run and as another jump is added during the progress of this Game.

 

STARTERS Certificate 1 -

We are looking for 3 successful runs out of 5 as the dog and the Handler "Learn the Game". The dog will learn to run away from the Handler, over the jumps to pick up the "toy" placed on the black mat and return with the toy over the same jumps and back to its Handler.

 

First Jump

The mat is placed in the Box area at the closed end of the Lane where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed. The first jump is put in its place ensuring that the dog is well away from this movement.

 

NO EQUIPMENT IS MOVED IF THE DOG IS CLOSE BY

 

The Handler walks the dog OVER this first jump and turns to face the Trainer.  With the dog close to this first jump, when released, it should go over it rather than around it.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over this jump, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to its Handler over this jump. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog back over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jump to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Second Jump

The Handler takes the dog back to the mat in the Box area close to the end of the Lane. A second jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the first and second jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 2 jumps are in line. With the dog close to this second jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next jump.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 2 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 2 jumps.When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is again discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over all the jumps? 

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

This exercise can be a big mental push for many dogs, so feel free to take a break and take your time as you want the dog to be succeed.

 

Third Jump

The Handler takes the dog back to the mat in the Box area close to the end of the Lane. A third jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the three jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 3 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the third jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next 2 jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 3 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 3 jumps. Again, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

  • Should the Trainer and Handler attempt a fourth jump?

This decision is left with the Trainer to determine how tired they think that the dog is. BUT we are not in a rush and would want the dog to have a good chance of success. The decision is in the best interests of the dog not the Handler.  

 

Having completed 3 out of 5 runs, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Starters Level Certificate 1.

 

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

STARTERS Certificate 2

When the dog returns for its next training session, it does no harm to go back a step or two to remind both the dog and the Handler of what was achieved and also the procedure that we used. Let's go back to 2 jumps.

 

The mat is placed in the box area at closed end of the Lane where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy. The dog is allowed a little play with the toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed. While the first and second jumps are being put in place, the Handler ensures that the dog is well away from this movement.

 

Second Jump

The Handler takes the dog back to the mat in the Box area close to the end of the Lane. When the 2 jumps are in place, the Handler walks the dog OVER these 2 jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 2 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next jump.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 2 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 2 jumps. Again, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the 2 jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is again discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over all the jumps? 

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Third Jump

The Handler takes the dog back to the mat in the Box area. A third jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the three jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 3 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next 2 jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 3 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 3 jumps. Again, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the 3 jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is again discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over all the jumps? 

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Fourth Jump

The Handler takes the dog back to the mat in the Box area. The fourth jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the all the jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over all these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. Again, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is again discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over all the jumps? 

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Having completed 3 out of 5 successful Bounce & Hand runs, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Starters Level Certificate 2 would have been awarded a 3-tiered rosette - pale green outer, yellow middle and white inner rosette.

 

<< New image with text >>

bounce & HAND BRONZE LEVEL

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

Having completed Starters Level, please re-read the instructions in Starters 1 and 2 to remind yourself of the disciplined requirements.

 

Bronze level concentrates on training the dog to CONSISTENTLY do Bounce correctly 5 runs out of 5 while also teaching the dog to do the Game running in different directions. The Handler raises his expectations of what he wants the dog to do, while the dog gains a deeper understanding of what is expected of it using these thorough training methods. This is also the stage where the dogs become accustomed to running over the jumps that are regularly and consistently placed.

 

It is tempting to rush dogs through their basic training in our eagerness to show how clever our dogs can be. However, in the early stages of training an exercise many dogs are accidentally doing it correctly. This can be by coincidence; because it is watching the Handler's unconscious body movements (ie not necessarily those chosen by the Handler to be the visual commands for the exercise); or because it has associated the environment with the exercise rather than the Handler's visual and spoken commands, so that the dog cannot understand what is required from it when asked to do the exercise in a new direction or location. The Bronze stage helps to overcome these difficulties.

 

Having had a successful training session, a dog should not attempt another training session for at least an hour. It is preferable that the stages should be done on different days so that the Handler and Trainer can check whether the dog has really learnt and understood the game (Latent Learning).

 

NO EQUIPMENT IS TO BE MOVED IF THE DOG IS CLOSE BY

 

BRONZE Certificate 1

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we need to set up for success. Therefore, with no other dogs around and also in the same Lane and running in the same direction (towards the gate) as previously, the same procedure as for 4 jumps is followed, as in Starters above.

 

First Run

The mat is placed in the Box area at the closed end of the Lane where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed.

 

To set up for success, we need to know how easily this dog achieved B&H Starters and train accordingly. Having referred to the notes on this dog's training record, i shall assume that the dog achieved Starters but wasn't too confident, whether it was the fault of the Handler remains to be seen.

 

So let us set up with just 2 jumps to start with, refreshing the dog's memory of Starters. With the dog away from the movement, the first 2 jumps are put in place. The Handler returns to the Box area and walks the dog OVER the 2 jumps and turns to face the Trainer.  With the dog close to the second jump, when released, it should go over it rather than around it.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump. The Trainer must check that the jumps are in line.

 

If the dog struggles with this first run, take a break and analyse what has happened, what was successful and what was not. Take a step or 2 backwards to using only 1 jump as described in Starters above. This is why these training sessions are in simple steps to understand the dog, the Handler and the communicatin between them.

 

Assuming that the dog was confident enough to complete the first run over 2 jumps successfully, the dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Third Jump

If successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog back to the mat in the Box area close to the end of the Lane avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. A third jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the three jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 3 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next 2 jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 3 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 3 jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jump to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

 

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Fourth Jump

If successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog back to the mat in the Box area close to the end of the Lane avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. A fourth jump is put in place. The Handler walks OVER the 4 jumps and turns to face the Trainer and the dog. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 4 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over all the jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 4 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 4 jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the AIms have been achieved and the ame finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved the Bounce & Hand Bronze Level Certificate 1.

 

Bounce & Hand may take longer to learn and train because there is the added challenge to the dog of whether it jumps over the jumps or runs around them. Do not get frustrated at this slower pace, it is quite normal and will mean that the dog will have thoroughly learnt each stage. Always check that the jumps are in line and that the Trainer is watching the Handler's body language to ensure success.

 

<< New image with text >>

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

BRONZE Certificate 2

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we need to set up for success. Therefore, with no other dogs around and also in the same Lane, the Box area is move to the other end of the Lane (close to the gate end) so that the dog is now running in the opposite direction. The same procedure as above for 4 jumps is followed. Because of this change in direction, patience may be required with the dog because of the changed environmental photo. You may need to take small steps until the dog is comfortable with these small changes. (Maybe not so small for a dog). While a change is direction may seem simple for us humans, it may take a dog time to accommodate this change. The dog may be used to running through a "scent picture" of smells 1,2,3,4 but running in the opposite direction, this "scent picture becomes 4,3,2,1 - which is very different.

 

First Run

The mat is placed close to the Gate end of the Lane where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed.

 

To set up for success, we need to know how easily this dog achieved B&H Bronze 1 Certificate and train accordingly. Having referred to the notes on this dog's training record, i shall assume that the dog achieved B&H Bronze 1 but wasn't too confident, whether it was the fault of the Handler remains to be seen.

 

So let us set up with just 2 jumps to start with, refreshing the dog's memory. With the dog away from the movement, the first 2 jumps are put in place. The Handler returns to the Box area and walks the dog OVER the 2 jumps and turns to face the Trainer.  With the dog close to the second jump, when released, it should go over it rather than around it.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump. The Trainer must check that the jumps are in line.

 

If the dog struggles with this first run, take a break and analyse what has happened, what was successful and what was not. Take a step or 2 backwards to using only 1 jump as described in Starters above. This is why these training sessions are in simple steps to understand the dog, the Handler and the communicatin between them.

 

Assuming that the dog was confident enough to complete the first run over 2 jumps successfully, the dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Third Jump

If successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog back to the mat close to the Gate,  avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. A third jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the three jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 3 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next 2 jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 3 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 3 jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jump to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Fourth Jump

If successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog back to the mat close to the Gate, avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. A fourth jump is put in place. The Handler walks OVER the 4 jumps and turns to face the Trainer and the dog. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 4 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over all the jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 4 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 4 jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved the Bounce & Hand Bronze Level Certificate 2.

 

Bounce & Hand may take longer to learn and train because there is the added challenge to the dog of whether it jumps over the jumps or runs around them. Switching running direction in the Lane can take a little getting used to as described above. Do not get frustrated at this slower pace, it is quite normal and will mean that the dog will have thoroughly learnt each stage. Always check that the jumps are in line and that the Trainer is watching the Handler's body language to ensure success.

 

 

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

BRONZE Certificate 3

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we need to set up for success. Therefore, with no other dogs around and also in the other Lane, the Box area is move back to the end of the Lane as previous, at the closed end of the Lane. The same procedure as above for 4 jumps is followed. Because of this change in Lane, patience may be required with the dog because of the changed environmental photo. You may need to take small steps until the dog is comfortable with these small changes. (Maybe not so small for a dog)

 

First Run

The mat is placed in the Box area where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed.

 

To set up for success, we need to know how easily this dog achieved B&H Bronze 1&2 Certificates and train accordingly. Having referred to the notes on this dog's training record, i shall assume that the dog achieved B&H Bronze 1&2 but wasn't too confident, whether it was the fault of the Handler remains to be seen.

 

So let us set up with just 2 jumps to start with, refreshing the dog's memory. With the dog away from the movement, the first 2 jumps are put in place. The Handler returns to the Box area and walks the dog OVER the 2 jumps and turns to face the Trainer.  With the dog close to the second jump, when released, it should go over it rather than around it.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump. The Trainer must check that the jumps are in line.

 

If the dog struggles with this first run, take a break and analyse what has happened, what was successful and what was not. Take a step or 2 backwards to using only 1 jump as described in Starters above. This is why these training sessions are in simple steps to understand the dog, the Handler and the communication between them.

 

Assuming that the dog was confident enough to complete the first run over 2 jumps successfully, the dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Third Jump

If successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog back to the mat in the Box area avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. A third jump is put in place. The Handler walks the dog OVER the three jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 3 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the next 2 jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 3 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 3 jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jump to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How the dog was tugging to get to the toy;

  • how cleanly did the dog pick up the toy;

  • was the dog distracted by the Trainer's presence?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

 

Fourth Jump

If successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog back to the mat in the Box area avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. A fourth jump is put in place. The Handler walks OVER the 4 jumps and turns to face the Trainer and the dog. The Handler and Trainer ensure that the 4 jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over all the jumps.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these 4 jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these 4 jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 successful Bounce & Hand runs, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Bronze Certificate 3 and would have been awarded a 3-tiered rosette - pale green outer, yellow middle and bronze inner rosette.

 

 

bounce & HAND silver LEVEL

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

Having completed Bronze Level, please re-read the instructions in Bronze to remind yourself of the disciplined requirements.

 

Silver level concentrates on training the dog to do Bounce & Hand with distractions, i.e. another dog working in a training Lane nearby. The Handler raises his expectations of what he wants the dog to do, while the dog gains a deeper understanding of what is expected of it using these thorough training methods. This is also the stage where the dogs become accustomed to running over the jumps that are regularly and consistently placed with another dog working nearby.

 

At this Silver Level, it is IMPERATIVE  that both dogs in their respective Lanes are allowed to READ THE NEWSPAPER. The Trainer in each Lane should watch the dog in their Lane to see the reaction of their dog to the presence of the other dog and the movement in the other Lane.

  • do the dogs notice each other?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the other?

  • If one of the dogs is becoming over excited, why?

  • Can these 2 dogs work together?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

 

For the benefit of each dog, the sitution needs to be managed.

 

Setting up

The mat is placed in the Box area at the closed end of the Lane where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed.

 

NO EQUIPMENT IS TO BE MOVED IF THE DOG IS CLOSE BY

 

SILVER Certificate 1

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are to setting up for success, therefore, we need to refer to this dog's training record, to find out how easily this dog coped with

  • Bounce Silver and with which dogs?

  • Bounce & Hand Bronze?

With this knowledge, we are able to get a glimpse of potential success with this dog rather than starting at the beginning with an unknown dog and behaviours. The first runs will be with another dog in the other training Lane and both running in the same direction (towards the Box area at the closed end of the training Lane). As previously, the same procedure is followed as for 4 jumps in Bounce & Hand Bronze above.

FIRST RUN

The same procedure is followed as for B&H Bronze and now considering the addition of the distracting dog, distracting humans and other movements in the other Lane, as per other SILVER level Games. I suggest that for the initial set of runs the distracting dog is an experienced dog that is focused on this task and not a complete beginner and will not be easily distracted by the new dog under test.

 

The Handler and Trainer take the dog under test to the mat in the Box area, close to the end of the Lane avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer. Meanwhile the experienced dog has performed similar in the other Lane.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

As with other SILVER level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in both training Lanes with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

Second and subsequent runs

If this first run was successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog under test to the mat in the Box area, close to the end of the Lane avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks the dog OVER all the jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer. Meanwhile the experienced dog has performed similar in the other Lane.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

As above, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

Again, there is much going on in both training Lanes with the 2 Handlers waving their arms about and shouting. 

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). . The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Silver Level  Certificate 1. Make a note on the dog's training record the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

Bounce & Hand may take longer to learn and train because there is the added distractions to the dog as well as whether it jumps over the jumps or runs around them. Do not get frustrated at this slower pace, it is quite normal and will mean that the dog will have thoroughly learnt each stage.

 

SILVER Certificate 2

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are setting up for success, and therefore, we need to refer to this dog's training record, to find out how easily this dog coped with

  • Bounce & Hand (previous Certificate 1)

  • Bounce Silver and with which dogs?

  • Bounce & Hand Bronze?

With this knowledge, we are able to get a glimpse of potential success with this dog rather than starting at the beginning with an unknown dog and behaviours. As with Certificate 1 above, the first runs will be with another dog in the other training Lane and both running in the SAME direction (towards the GATE, which is the direction that they haven't done before). As previously, the same procedure is followed as per Bounce & Hand Silver Certificate 1 above.

FIRST RUN

A similar procedure is followed (different direction in Lane) with the distracting dog, distracting humans and other movements in the other Lane, as per other SILVER level Games. The dog under test has already achieved B&H Silver Certificate 1 so, although the Trainer may consider changing other parameters, I would suggest not making too many changes. Therefore keep it simple for the benefit of success. Again, for this Certificate, I suggest using an experienced dog (as the distracting dog) that is focused on this task and not a complete beginner and will not be easily distracted by the new dog under test.

 

The Handler and Trainer take the dog under test to the mat placed close to the GATE end of the Lane and avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer. Meanwhile the experienced dog has performed similar in the other Lane.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (preferably using body movements, but vocally if necessary) to guide the dog over the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

As with other SILVER level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • any reaction to the dog under test running in the different direction in the Lane?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in both training Lanes with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test. This is why these training sessions are in simple steps to understand the dog, the Handler and the communication between them.

Second and subsequent runs

If this first run was successful, the Handler and Trainer take the dog under test to the mat close to the GATE end of the Lane avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks the dog OVER all the jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog close to the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer. Meanwhile the experienced dog has performed similar in the other Lane.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

As above, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

Again, there is much going on in both training Lanes with the 2 Handlers waving their arms about and shouting. 

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test. This is why these training sessions are in simple steps to understand the dog, the Handler and the communication between them.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Silver Level Certificate 2. Make a note on the dog's training record the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

 

Bounce & Hand may take longer to learn and train because there is the added distractions to the dog as well as whether it jumps over the jumps or runs around them. Do not get frustrated at this slower pace, it is quite normal and will mean that the dog will have thoroughly learnt each stage. Always check that the jumps are in line and that the Trainer is watching the Handler's body language to ensure success.

 

SILVER Certificate 3

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are setting up for success, and therefore, we need to refer to this dog's training record, to find out how easily this dog coped with

  • Bounce & Hand Silver Certificates 1 and 2 and with which dogs?

With this knowledge, we are able to get a glimpse of potential success with this OUR dog rather than starting at the beginning with an unknown dog and behaviours. As with Certificate 1 above, the first runs will be with another dog in the other training Lane and now both running in the direction first adopted towards the Box end. As previously, the same procedure is followed as per Bounce & Hand Silver Certificate 1 above.

FIRST RUN

The same procedure is followed with the distracting dog, distracting humans and other movements in the other Lane, as per other SILVER level Games. OUR dog has already achieved B&H Silver Certificate 1&2 so the Trainer may consider pushing OUR dog by using an inexperienced dog as the distracting dog. We are now assuming that our dog is the experienced dog. We may rightly be beginning to have confidence in this, OUR dog.

 

The Handler and Trainer take our dog to the mat placed close to the Box end of the Lane, avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. Still, the Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog maybe further back from the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer. Meanwhile the inexperienced dog in the other Lane has performed similarly.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (preferably using body movements, but vocally if necessary) to guide the dog over the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

As with other SILVER level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • any reaction from OUR dog running in the different direction in the Lane?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in both training Lanes with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING

 

OUR dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was OUR dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was OUR dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did OUR dog pick up the toy?

  • Was OUR dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was OUR dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide OUR dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by OUR dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing OUR dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the other distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to OUR dog. This is why these training sessions are in simple steps to understand OUR dog, the Handler and the communication between them.

Second and subsequent runs

If this first run was successful, the Handler and Trainer take OUR dog o the mat at the BOX end of the Lane avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks OUR dog OVER all the jumps and turns to face the Trainer. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line. With the dog maybe further back from the nearest jump, it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer. Meanwhile the inexperienced dog has performed similar in the other Lane.

 

When the dog is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the black mat and the dog is released to run over these jumps, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. Again, having picked up the toy, when the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over all the jumps. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

As above, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

Again, there is much going on in both training Lanes with the 2 Handlers waving their arms about and shouting. 

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler and the dog. The toy is NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). Tthe Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Silver Level Certificate 3, and would be awarded a 3-tiered rosette - pale green outer, yellow middle and silver inner rosette. Make a note on the dog's training record the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

bounce & HAND gold LEVEL

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

Gold Level concentrates on MANAGING the training of the dog to perform a Game with another dog working in the SAME training Lane. Having completed B & H Silver, please re-read the instructions in B & H Silver to remind yourself of the disciplined requirements.

 

At this Gold Level, there are 2 Handlers, 2 dogs and 2 trainers in the same Lane. The situation must be managed. The dogs are now accustomed to running over the jumps that are regularly and consistently placed. The change is now working with another dog in the same Lane, therefore managing the situation is of paramount importance not just for the safety of both dogs but also that both dogs are now trusting their Handlers to understand and manage the situation to prevent them from having a bad experience.

 

At this Gold Level, it is IMPERATIVE  that both dogs are allowed to READ THE NEWSPAPER. Depending on the reactions of the 2 dogs to the presence of the other dog in close proximity, both dogs could still be on their leads while reading the newspaper, ensuring that the situation is managed. The 2 Trainers should be watching the dogs to see the reaction of each dog to the presence of the other dog.

  • do the dogs notice each other?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the other?

  • If one of the dogs is becoming over excited, why?

  • Can these 2 dogs work together?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

 

Setting up

The mat is placed in the Box area at the closed end of the Lane where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. The toy for the dog is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line.

 

GOLD Certificate 1

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are setting up for success therefore, we need to refer to this dog's training record, to find out how easily this dog coped with

  • Bounce & Hand Silver and with which dogs?

  • other Gold Level Games with which other dogs?

With this knowledge, we are able to get a glimpse of potential success with this dog rather than starting at the beginning with an unknown dog and behaviours. The first runs will be with another dog in the same training Lane and both running in the same direction (towards the Box area at the closed end of the training Lane). As previously, the same procedure is followed as for 4 jumps in Bounce & Hand Silver above.

FIRST RUN

The same procedure is followed as for B&H Silver and now considering the addition of the distracting dog, distracting humans and other movements in the SAME Lane, as per other GOLD Level Games. I suggest that for the initial set of runs the distracting dog is an experienced dog that is focused on this task and should NOT be a complete beginner and will not be easily distracted by the new dog under test.

 

Setting up - (as above) is repeated

The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and moves away from them before turning to face the Trainer.  Meanwhile the experienced dog performs similar (restrained recall) over the jumps in the same Lane. The Trainer at the Box end will also have the more experienced dog's toy/retrieve article.

 

When the dog under test is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is positioned close to the nearest jump, so that it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

Once this dog is under control, the second, more experienced dog is released to run over the jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve his own toy, turn around and carry the toy back to his Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

As with other Gold Level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in the training Lane with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about when their dog is running. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toys from the 2 Handlers. The toys are NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of these retrieves are discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Second and subsequent runs

If this first run was successful,

Setting up - (as above) is repeated

 

The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and moves away from them before turning to face the Trainer.  Meanwhile the experienced dog performs similar (restrained recall) over the jumps in the same Lane. The Trainer at the Box end will also have the more experienced dog's toy/retrieve article.

 

When the dog under test is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is positioned close to the nearest jump, so that it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

Once this dog is under control, the second, more experienced dog is released to run over the jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve his own toy, turn around and carry the toy back to his Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over all the jumps.

 

As with other Gold Level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in the training Lane with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about when their dog is running. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toys from the 2 Handlers. The toys are NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of these retrieves are discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). Tthe Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Gold Level Certificate 1. Make a note on the dog's training record of the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

GOLD Certificate 2

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are setting up for success, and therefore, we need to refer to this dog's training record, to find out how easily this dog coped with

  • Bounce & Hand (previous Gold Certificate 1) with which dog?

  • Bounce & Hand Silver with which dogs?

With this knowledge, we are able to get a glimpse of potential success with this dog rather than starting at the beginning with an unknown dog and behaviours. As with Certificate 1 above, the first runs will be with another dog in the SAME training Lane and both running in the SAME direction (towards the GATE, which is the direction that they haven't done before). As previously, the same procedure is followed as per Bounce & Hand Gold Certificate 1 above.

FIRST RUN

A similar procedure is followed to Gold Certificate 1 except that the dogs are running in the different direction in the Lane with the distracting dog, distracting humans and other movements in the SAME Lane. The dog under test has already achieved B&H Gold Certificate 1 so, although the Trainer may consider changing other parameters, I would suggest not making too many changes. Therefore keep it simple for the benefit of success. Again, for this Certificate, I suggest using an experienced dog (as the distracting dog) that is focused on this task and not a complete beginner and will not be easily distracted by the new dog under test.

 

At this Gold Level, it is IMPERATIVE  that both dogs are allowed to READ THE NEWSPAPER. Depending on the reactions of the 2 dogs to the presence of the other dog in close proximity, both dogs could still be on their leads while reading the newspaper, ensuring that the situation is managed. The 2 Trainers should be watching the dogs to see the reaction of each dog to the presence of the other dog.

  • do the dogs notice each other?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the other?

  • If one of the dogs is becoming over excited, why?

  • Can these 2 dogs work together?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

 

Setting up - (as above) is repeated

 

The Handler and Trainer take the dog under test to the mat placed close to the GATE end of the Lane and avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and moves away from them before turning to face the Trainer. Meanwhile the experienced dog performs similar (restrained recall) over the jumps in the same Lane. The Trainer at the Box end will also have the more experienced dog's toy/retrieve article.

 

When the dog under test is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is positioned close to the nearest jump, so that it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

Once this dog is under control, the second, more experienced dog is released to run over the jumps down to the Trainer at the Box end, retrieve his own toy, turn around and carry the toy back to his Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

As with other Gold Level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in the training Lane with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about when their dog is running. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toys from the 2 Handlers. The toys are NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of these retrieves are discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Gold Level Certificate 2. Make a note on the dog's training record of the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

GOLD Certificate 3

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are setting up for success, and therefore, we need to refer to this dog's training record, to find out how easily this dog coped with

  • Bounce & Hand (previous Gold Certificates 1&2) with which dogs?

  • Bounce & Hand Silver with which dogs?

With this knowledge, we are able to get a glimpse of potential success with this dog rather than starting at the beginning with an unknown dog and behaviours. Having achieved Gold Certificates 1&2 above, the dog has run in both directions in the SAME Lane and with the SAME dog or was it with 2 different dogs? see Training Record.

The Trainer now needs to make a decision to use

  • a different Lane and/or a different dog

Does the Trainer consder the dog under test to be sufficiently mature to experiment with a new inexperienced dog in the SAME Lane as before?

 

Because of the training methods we have developed here, we have only changed 1 environmental parameter at a time, thus not over-phasing the dog.

FIRST RUN

The dog under test will be running in a new, different Lane with the same distracting/experienced dog, distracting humans and other movements all in the SAME different Lane.

 

At this Gold Level, it is IMPERATIVE  that both dogs are allowed to READ THE NEWSPAPER. Depending on the reactions of the 2 dogs to the presence of the other dog in close proximity, both dogs could still be on their leads while reading the newspaper, ensuring that the situation is managed. The 2 Trainers should be watching the dogs to see the reaction of each dog to the presence of the other dog.

  • do the dogs notice each other?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the other?

  • If one of the dogs is becoming over excited, why?

  • Can these 2 dogs work together?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

 

Setting up - (as above) is repeated

 

The Handler and Trainer take the dog under test to the mat placed close to the GATE end of the Lane and avoiding the jumps, as discussed above. The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and moves away from them before turning to face the Trainer. Meanwhile the experienced dog performs similar (restrained recall) over the jumps in the same Lane. The Trainer at the Box end will also have the more experienced dog's toy/retrieve article.

 

When the dog under test is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is positioned close to the nearest jump, so that it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

Once this dog is under control, the second, more experienced dog is released to run over the jumps down to the Trainer at the Box end, retrieve his own toy, turn around and carry the toy back to his Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

As with other Gold Level Games, the 2 Trainers have to work co-operatively as before - in terms of

  • which dog do they release first?

  • What is the reaction of each dog to the release of the other?

  • If one of the dogs is struggling, why?

  • Do you need to change the distraction dog?

There is much going on in the training Lane with the 2 Handlers waving their arms and moving about when their dog is running. FROM THE HANDLERS, THERE SHOULD BE BODY MOVEMENTS ONLY WITH A MINIMUM OF SHOUTING.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toys from the 2 Handlers. The toys are NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of these retrieves are discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog distracted by the other dog's presence?

  • Was the dog distracted by the Handler's presence, arm waving etc?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Gold Level Certificate 3, and would be awarded a 3-tiered rosette - pale green outer, yellow middle and gold inner rosette. Make a note on the dog's training record the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

 

 

bounce & HAND platinum LEVEL

see Before Each Training Session Begins

 

Platinum level concentrates on MANAGING the training of the dog to GENERALISE and to perform a Game in completely different environments

 

With 5 succesful runs out of 5 required, we are setting up for success. The Trainers and Handler have already learnt a lot about this dog over the previous training sessions. As previously, the same procedure is followed as for 4 jumps in Bounce & Hand Silver above so please re-read the instructions in B & H Silver to remind yourself of the disciplined requirements.

 

At this Platinum Level, there is 1 Handler, 1 dog and 1 trainer. This new training environment must still be managed. The dog has become accustomed to running in an enclosed Lane (barrier netting) over the jumps that are regularly and consistently placed. The change is now working with the dog in the open and not being restricted by the barrier netting in a Lane. Therefore managing the situation is of paramount importance and now trusting the Handler to understand and manage the situation to prevent the dog from having a bad experience.

 

At this Platinum Level, the jumps are set up as required outside of the Lanes, see diagram position. BUT, as usual before any training session, it is IMPERATIVE that the dog is allowed to READ THE NEWSPAPER in one of the Lanes before we commence this next stage of training. Initially, this Platinum training is undertaken with no other dogs working in the Lanes so that the dog is not distracted. As this Level of training progresses, distractions of dogs working within the Lanes are slowy introduced testing the reaction of this dog under test. The Trainer should be watching the dog to see its reaction to this new environment and to the other distractions being introduced.

  • how does the dog adapt to this new environment?

  • does the dog notice the other distractions as they are introduced?

  • How does the dog react to the other distractions?

 

Platinum Certificate 1

 

Setting up - stage 1

The mat is placed at one end of this new training area where it remains and is NOT removed from this location (environmental photo) while the Game is in progress. When the dog is ready, it is taken from Reading the Newspaper to this new training area. As before, the toy for the dog is placed on the mat and the dog (on its lead) is re-introduced to it as its favourite toy and the dog is allowed a little play with this toy which is then removed from the dog and given to the Trainer. The Trainer stands (with the toy out of sight from the dog) on the opposite side of the mat from the dog, ready to place the toy on the mat when instructed. The Handler and Trainer ensure that all the jumps are in line.

 

Setting up - stage 2

The Handler walks the dog OVER the four jumps and turns to face the Trainer. 

When the dog under test is focused on the Trainer, the toy is placed on the mat and the dog is positioned close to the nearest jump, so that it should run over this jump rather than avoid it and also run over the other jumps down to the Trainer, retrieve the toy, turn around and carry the toy back to the Handler over these jumps. When the dog turns to run back to the Handler, he may be disorientated as to where the Handler is and so the Handler will have to work the dog (vocally as well as using body movement) to guide the dog over the jump. The Trainer does not interact with the dog, only the Handler but the Trainer is watching to see how the Handler draws the dog over the jump.

 

The dog is rewarded for a successful retrieve by being given a treat or a "little" play with the toy and then put back on the lead. The Trainer walks calmly OVER the jumps to take the toy from the Handler. The toys are NOT thrown to the Trainer. The success or otherwise of this retrieve is discussed.

  • Was the dog successful, if not how do we make it a success?

  • How was the dog tugging to get to the toy?

  • How cleanly did the dog pick up the toy?

  • Was the dog focused or distracted by the other events?

  • Was the Handler able to guide the dog back over the jump?

  • Was the distance run by the dog ok or was the process taking too long and overfacing/over-stressing the dog?

If necessary, take a step or 2 backwards, use fewer jumps, hold the distracting dog back and proceed as described above. The situation needs to be read and managed to provide success to the dog under test.

 

Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Platinum Level Certificate 1. 

 

 

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Having completed 5 out of 5 runs over the 4 jumps, the Aims have been achieved and the Game finishes. The dog is rewarded, given a drink and returned to the car so that the lessons learnt will slowly sink deeper into his brain and memory (Latent Learning/Memory). The Handler has achieved Bounce & Hand Platinum Level Certificate 1, and would be awarded a 3-tiered rosette - pale green outer, yellow middle and gold inner rosette. Make a note on the dog's training record the name of the distracting dog because this may prove useful later.

 

The Handler learns -

  • To bring all their experience of training their dog to do the previous Games, and use this knowledge to help it understand how to retrieve and jump at the same time.

  • That dogs can become so focused on the retrieve article that they need help from their Handlers to realise that the hurdles need to be jumped as the dog returns. This is done by careful attention to the Handler's movements, and their judgement of the dog's speed and direction.

  • Never to walk past a jump. If a dog sees their Handler walk around a jump it is quite justified in thinking it is allowed to too - after all it is the quickest and easiest option! The dog will also come to this conclusion if the Handler (or Helper) has the dog on a lead and walks it past a jump whilst returning to one end of the lane or the other. Remember - always take the dog in a deep wide curve so that the dog never finds itself walking near or past a jump. If curving is not an option due to lack of space - walk over the jumps with your dog.

  • The importance of standing in the correct position so that the dog's "line of sight" to its Handler is over the jumps, particularly when the dog is turning after retrieving the "ball" and has not focused on the first jump on its way back.  The Handler learns to take a sideways step, and/or move an arm to the side as well, to guide the dog back to the centre of the lane so that it does the jumps correctly.  They must then immediately step back to the centre to keep the dog's attention on them and the motivator and only move to the right hand side of the runback area once the dog has crossed the finish line.

  • To monitor and carefully control their body movements (ie their hands, arms, shoulders, torso, head, legs, and feet) as the dog runs towards them.

  • To learn by trail and error whether to show the dog's motivator before the dog crosses the finish line in case the dog drops the "ball" in anticipation of having it in its mouth.

  • Never to play the Bounce & Hand Game without the aid of a Helper/Trainer,

  • Never throw the "ball" for the dog to retrieve in the runback area as this may distract other dogs 

  • To play a fun game at home with the dog, using only one jump, the mat, the "ball" and a Trainer.

  • As always finish each short training session (a maximum of 5 runs at a time) on a positive note - if the dog is unable to understand what you are trying to teach it, ask it to do something it is confident of doing instead (eg retrieve over fewer jumps, perhaps closer together).  Then go away and think of how you can train the dog taking smaller steps in the training programme so that it can succeed in the next session.

 

The dog learns -

  • Once it has picked up the retrieve article from the black rubber car mat, to adjust and correct its turning curve and eyesight so that it can run back over the four hurdles, without missing any, and return to the handler.

  • Through trail and error that if it goes over the jumps it will be instantly rewarded, but only if it is also holding the "ball" in its mouth and placing it in the Handler's hand. If the dog either avoids a jump, or drops the "ball" before reaching the Handler, it does not get the motivator and the exciting Game is stopped. Therefore, the dog learns that in order to continue the jump and retrieve Game and be rewarded with its motivator, it must drop the "ball" in the Handler's hand.  The " ball" in the hand is the end of the Game and when it is rewarded and praised.

  • To cope with the added excitement of jumping when retrieving, as this extra stimulus can make some dogs stressed.

  • To tightly turn on the mat so that it can change direction quickly as it picks up the "ball", and focus on the first jump on the return journey (which is only 15ft/4.5m from the mat).  Many dogs (particularly long bodied dogs) find this difficult to do at first, as their turning curve is too wide and takes them past this first jump.

  • That even though jumps have been introduced to the retrieve game, the black rubber mat, with the Helper standing directly behind it, is still where the retrieve articles are always placed.

  • That it does not have to veer round the last jump in order to avoid the dog that is running towards it when it is doing Gold Level. It learns to trust the other dog being so close to it and it's handler.

 

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